Conferences

Conferences I’ve Organised

The Mediated Text

I was one of two co-organisers of this symposium at Loughborough University’s London campus, and also served as the session chair for the closing remarks. The symposium was affiliated with Loughborough University’s Textual Futures Sub-Beacon.

The Book in the Digital Age

I was the primary organiser for the Book History Research Network‘s 2018 autumn study day. The day attracted numerous international presenters, and we are now working towards publishing some of the papers in a special issue of a reputable journal (peer review is currently underway).

Conferences I’ve Presented At

The Birth of the Algorithmic Author: NLG Systems as Tools and Agents

Presented at the Electronic Literature Organization Conference (15 July 2019), hosted annually by the Electronic Literature Organization. Argues for a semantic shift from considering natural language generation (NLG) systems as ‘tools’ to considering them as ‘agents’.

Who is the Author of the Computer-Generated Text?

Presented as a lightning talk at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) (4 June 2019). Serves as a tl;dr version of doctoral research project. The question mark on the final slide replaces the ‘woman shrugging’ emoji.

I also did this presentation for a Loughborough University Café Academique (10 July 2019).

Natural Language Generation: Negotiating Text Production In Our Digital Humanity

Presented at the Digital Humanities Congress (7 September 2018), organised by the University of Sheffield’s Digital Humanities Institute. Provides an introduction to natural language generation, as well as to the notion of the ‘hermeneutic contract’. Reviews the results of a large-scale online reader-response questionnaire wherein participants were asked to attribute authorship to a computer-generated news article.

What Natural Language Generation Means for Authorship and Why We Should Care

Presented at the Electronic Literature Organization Conference (15 August 2018), hosted annually by the Electronic Literature Organization. Provides an introduction to natural language generation, as well as to the notion of the ‘hermeneutic contract’. Reviews the results of a large-scale online reader-response questionnaire wherein participants were asked to attribute authorship to a computer-generated news article.

Enhancing Your Loughborough Community

A last-minute presentation at the Loughborough University Doctoral College’s annual Summer Showcase (6 June 2018). Provided personal anecdotes about experiences within Loughborough University’s large- and smaller-scale academic and social communities. Includes some rather unflattering photos of yours truly (enjoy!).

Attributing Authorship to Computer-Generated Texts

Presented at the ‘Thinking Big: New Ambitions for English and the Humanities’ conference (18-19 January 2018) organised by the Institute of English Studies (School of Advanced Study, University of London) in partnership with the School of English, Newcastle University. Provided an introduction to natural language generation. Presented preliminary data about the attribution of authorship to computer-generated texts, as acquired through a large-scale online reader response questionnaire. Speakers were invite-only.

I also chaired one of this conference’s ‘Digital Horizons’ workshops.

But Who is the Author?: Considering Computer-Generated Texts

Presented at the Book History Research Network’s ‘Textual Authority’ Study Day (18 December 2017), held at Queen Mary University of London. Provided an introduction to natural language generation, as well as to the notion of the ‘hermeneutic contract’ as it has been defined by the supervisory team. Presented preliminary data about the attribution of authorship to computer-generated texts, as acquired through focus groups and a large-scale online reader response questionnaire. Situated computer-generated texts within Marshall McLuhan’s tetrad of media effects.

Towards a New Sociology of the Text: 5-Minute Researcher Talk

I had five minutes to introduce non-specialists to my doctoral research at Loughborough University’s Doctoral College Research Conference (7 December 2017). I won the ‘Best Researcher Talk’ prize for this presentation. Here’s a photo of me strikin’ a power pose while presenting.

Natural Language Generation: Breaking the Hermeneutic Contract

Presented at Oxford Brookes University’s ‘New Directions in Print Culture Studies’ symposium (9 May 2017), hosted annually by the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies. Provides an introduction to natural language generation, as well as to the notion of the ‘hermeneutic contract’ as it has been defined by the supervisory team. Selected case studies focus on long-form narratives within the genres of conceptual writing and computer-generated output.

Authorship Without Agency?: Responding to Computer-Generated Texts

Presented at Loughborough University’s School of the Arts, English and Drama’s first-year doctoral colloquium (1 February 2017). A review of current PhD research, and anticipated future directions. Always looking for collaborative opportunities and relevant conversations about algorithmic authorship and artificial intelligence.

Scenarios of the Revolution: Inventory Books as Sites of Countercultural Representation

Presented at Cardiff University’s ‘Livres d’Artistes: The Artist’s Book and Theory and Practice’ conference (4-6 December 2015). Adapted from chapter of MA dissertation.

Conferences I’ve Attended

Digital Cultures: Knowledge / Culture / Technology (19-22 September)

This conference was preceded by the Lüneburg Summer School for Digital Cultures (see below), and was co-hosted by Leuphana University’s Centre for Digital Cultures and Western Sydney University’s Institute for Culture and Society.

I chaired the ‘Facebook: Like, Emojis, Brands’ panel.

The Lüneburg Summer School for Digital Cultures 2018: ‘Historiographies of Digital Cultures’ (16-19 September 2018)

Hosted by Leuphana University’s Centre for Digital Cultures, this annual Summer School provides advanced training in the study of media, their theory, aesthetics, and history. Within an exclusive group of graduate students from around the world, I participated in seminars about personal research projects and more overarching theoretical and empirical issues relevant to media studies, digital humanities, and science and technology studies. My tuition, travel, and accommodation costs were covered by the Centre.

The European Summer University in Digital Humanities: ‘Culture & Technology’ (17-27 July 2018)

The annual European Summer University in Digital Humanities in Leipzig (Germany) is part of the International Digital Humanities Training Network. The Summer School teaches practical digital humanities tools and explores myriad theoretical perspectives associated with the field. I was a member of the Stylometry workshop for both weeks 1 and 2, where we learned how to conduct quantitative literary analyses using R. My tuition fees were covered by a fellowship from the University of Victoria’s Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, and all other costs were covered by a Santander Mobility Award.

The 10th International Natural Language Generation Conference (4-7 September 2017)

Read my live-tweets (of which there are many) from INLG2017 here.

I also served as a student helper. The INLG2017 student helper team supported the conference’s organizers to ensure that everything ran smoothly. Here’s photographic evidence that I took this role very seriously (FYI: I did actually take it seriously).

Engaging with Screens: Art, Archive, Book (31 May 2017)

This conference was hosted by Loughborough University’s Digital Humanities Research Group. Read my live-tweets from ‘Engaging with Screens’ here. I tweeted on behalf of @LboroAEDRes.

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